Friday, May 27, 2011

I HAVE A GREAT BUSINESS PLAN, BUT SOMEONE HAS BEATEN ME TO IT

I think I'm ready to get out of the journalism game.

Sure, I love writing and reporting about sports on a daily basis, but to tell you the truth it's just not as lucrative as I had hoped when I made the decision to become a journalist more than a decade ago.

Let's face it, the only reason we go to college in the first place is to find a career we love and then get paid a ton to do it, right? Again, absolutely love the career ... but the pay? Not bad, but certainly not a "ton."

So, I have decided to go into business for myself, to live the dream of way less work, way more pay — the true American dream!

Of course, no great business can come to fruition without a plan. You have to know exactly what you want to do, how to do it, and find the resources to make it all happen.

Here's my "business plan" in a nutshell ...

OBJECTIVE: 
Make a ton of money in the sports industry. Duh!

EMPLOYEES: 
Student-interns, financial officers, communications/branding experts, enforcement officials and legal professionals.

EMPLOYEE DESCRIPTIONS (total workers): 
STUDENT-INTERNS (tens of thousands) — Fully responsible for our overall business product.

FRONT OFFICE PERSONNEL (about 400) — General office duties ... responsible for the marketing and branding of our product, as well as strictly enforcing that our student-interns do not receive any benefits from other services besides our own, while under the company's rule.

EMPLOYEE EXPENSES:
Approximately $6 million. That includes salary to myself (the C.E.O) and the front office personnel. The student-interns are unpaid employees.

REVENUE RESOURCES: Tournaments, sporting events, television rights, corporate sponsors, apparel, video games, etc ...

ONE-YEAR PROJECTION: $700 million in revenue.

THREE-YEAR PROJECTION: Billions!

MISC. BUSINESS EXPENSES: None.

Sounds like a pretty good gig, huh? I mean, not much overhead, tons of generated revenue and a whole lot of power over your employees. Basically, legal exploitation.

Actually, it sounds too good to be true, doesn't it? No way could I have been the first one to think of such a racket.

Well, I didn't.

The NCAA already beat me to it.